"Lack of information" poses uncertain future for Mexico tourism's Canadian offices


"Lack of information" poses uncertain future for Mexico tourism's Canadian offices
Despite the possibility of his offices closing, Cesar Mendoza, regional director for Canada at the Mexico Tourism Board, celebrated a successful year last night at The Rec Room in Toronto.
Michael Pihach

Michael Pihach is an award-winning journalist with a keen interest in digital storytelling. In addition to PAX, Michael has also written for CBC Life, Ryerson University Magazine, IN Magazine, and DailyXtra.ca. Michael joins PAX after years of working in Canada’s TV industry.

The Mexico Tourism Board's Canadian offices face an uncertain future as Mexico moves on changing the way it promotes tourism under President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s new administration.  

Mexico’s Tourism Secretary Miguel Torruco confirmed yesterday (Dec 6.) that the Tourism Promotion Council (CPTM), including its offices abroad, will disband, a new report suggests.  

For Cesar Mendoza, regional director for Canada at the Mexico Tourism Board, that means his office, in addition to Mexico’s 21 other tourism offices around the world, could be closed.

Mendoza emphasizes the word “could.”

“It’s not official yet. We haven’t received any official documents at my offices,” Mendoza told PAX last night (Dec. 6) at the Mexico Tourism Board’s annual holiday cocktail reception at The Rec Room in Toronto. "We’re not sure about [the new government’s] strategy in terms of how it’s going to work.”

The whole situation has created a sense of “uncertainty” due to the “lack of information,” Mendoza said.

Despite all of this, Mendoza remained positive last night as he hosted more than two dozen trade partners and media at his annual end-of-year reception, an event he refers to as “our way of saying thank-you to the industry.”Cesar Mendoza, regional director for Canada at the Mexico Tourism Board with Michele Martinson, sales director for Canada at Aeromexico at The Rec Room in Toronto last night.

“Tonight is a way of closing the fantastic year we’ve had,” Mendoza told PAX at the party, noting the 2.1 million Canadians who are projected to visit Mexico by the end of 2018, which is an eleven per cent increase over last year.

Phasing out Mexico’s tourism council is part of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s plan to turn the country’s tourism responsibilities over to Mexico's global embassies.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s new administration took office just recently on December 1st.

“What I want to tell the industry is that I am sure the new government is going to take the correct measures to [uphold] the performance of our Canadian partners and tour operators – how they’ve been putting more seats and flights into Mexico,” Mendoza told PAX.

Despite not knowing the fate of his office in Canada, Mendoza remained optimistic with the belief that Mexico’s new government will not let their Canadian travel partners down.

“The new administration will get everyone together and let them know what the new strategy is,” Mendoza said.

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